• PARTNER: PROTECT YOUR WATERS
  • Go To: THE FLIES OF YELLOWSTONE
  • Go To: YELLOWSTONE FISHING WEATHER
  • Go To: YELLOWSTONE FLY FISHING MAPS
  • Visit: Moldy Chum
  • Visit: The Horse's Mouth
  • Visit: Chi Wulff
  • Visit: Parks' Fly Shop
  • Visit: Montana Cowgirl
  • Monday, September 17, 2007

    If Not Now - When?

    SNEAKY SUBMARINES BYPASS BARNS
    Famous River Bends Show Lots Of Beach
    Upper Gibbon Fishers Slightly Affected By Burn

    does your trout have surrogate parents?
    guyser photo
    .. The weather is about to give us a break. A break from the beautiful Indian Summer and a town with no empty rooms. It couldn't happen at a better time. The Fall Fishing Frenzy has been a bit slow and behind the traditional calendar.
    .. There are two reports, (from trusted sources - one with a photo - of 20" brown trout,) in National Park Meadows on the Madison River. Both were taken on size 12 Yellow Woolly Worms - not Woolly Buggers but Woolly Worms. The sneaky critters seem to have charged through the gauntlet of fishers that have lined the Barns Holes and Baker's Hole these last few days - good on 'em! The feat is even more amazing considering how low the river is and it's continued wormth.
    .. The Gibbon River is fishing very well. The prescribed burn at Norris pumped smoke into the little meadow adjacent to the campground periodically, but only the fishers seemed affected. The eager Brookies and small Brown Trout were in a ravenous mood yesterday. Attractors and Hoppers were the key, not counting Feather Dusters and Prince Nymphs. Royal Wulff's in size 12 were gobbled up in all sections from Last Hole to the meadow above Virginia Cascade. The low water has concentrated the fish, and even the shadows of eager tourists did not seem to spook the gluttons. Fish to 14" are readily available in the meadow at Virginia Cascade - parking was surprisingly available on both Saturday and Sunday. Here's a video of the Gibbon River, from yesterday.

    video
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    .. The University of Idaho and some scientists from Tokyo University are working on a way to efficiently breed fish with surrogate parents.
    The Tokyo University inventors dubbed their method "surrogate broodstocking." They injected newly hatched but sterile Asian masu salmon with sperm-growing cells from rainbow trout — and watched the salmon grow up to produce trout.

    .. The Idaho research team is going to try to implement the technique to propagate the endangered Sockeye Salmon. This technique holds promise for many of the disappearing salmonids across North America.